Lit. Ministy - Eucharist Minister

The Eucharist Minister at Mass

“I am the living bread that came down from heaven; if any one eats of this bread, he will live for ever; . . . he who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life and . . . abides in me, and I in him” (Jn 6:51, 54, 56).  The Eucharist is the heart and the summit of the Church’s life, for in it Christ associates his Church and all her members with his sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving offered once for all on the cross to his Father; by this sacrifice he pours out the graces of salvation on his Body which is the Church. (CCC, 1407)

The Eucharistic celebration always includes: the proclamation of the Word of God; thanksgiving to God the Father for all his benefits, above all the gift of his Son; the consecration of bread and wine; and participation in the liturgical banquet by receiving the Lord’s body and blood. These elements constitute one single act of worship. (CCC, 1408)

The Eucharist is the memorial of Christ’s Passover, that is, of the work of salvation accomplished by the life, death, and resurrection of Christ, a work made present by the liturgical action. (CCC, 1409) 

It is Christ himself, the eternal high priest of the New Covenant who, acting through the ministry of the priests, offers the Eucharistic sacrifice. And it is the same Christ, really present under the species of bread and wine, who is the offering of the Eucharistic sacrifice. (CCC, 1410)

The essential signs of the Eucharistic sacrament are wheat bread and grape wine, on which the blessing of the Holy Spirit is invoked and the priest pronounces the words of consecration spoken by Jesus during the Last Supper: “This is my body which will be given up for you. . . . This is the cup of my blood. . . .” (CCC, 1412)

By the consecration, the transubstantiation of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ is brought about. Under the consecrated species of bread and wine Christ himself, living and glorious, is present in a true, real, and substantial manner: his Body and his Blood, with his soul and his divinity. (CCC, 1413) 

As sacrifice, the Eucharist is also offered in reparation for the sins of the living and the dead and to obtain spiritual or temporal benefits from God. (CCC, 1414)

Communion with the Body and Blood of Christ increases the communicant’s union with the Lord, forgives his venial sins, and preserves him from grave sins. Since receiving this sacrament strengthens the bonds of charity between the communicant and Christ, it also reinforces the unity of the Church as the Mystical Body of Christ. (CCC, 1416)

The Church warmly recommends that the faithful receive Holy Communion when they participate in the celebration of the Eucharist; she obliges them to do so at least once a year. (CCC, 1417)

Having passed from this world to the Father, Christ gives us in the Eucharist the pledge of glory with him. Participation in the Holy Sacrifice identifies us with his Heart, sustains our strength along the pilgrimage of this life, makes us long for eternal life, and unites us even now to the Church in heaven, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and all the saints. (CCC, 1419)

Baptized Catholics who have attained the age of reason (normally age 7) may be prepared by the local parish to receive the sacraments of Reconciliation and Eucharist. The interested individual (or if a child, his or her parents) should contact the pastor of the local parish for more information on the program of preparation for First Reconciliation and First Eucharist. Those who have been baptized in another Christian religion and are interested in receiving the Eucharist must first become confirmed as a Catholic.

Those individuals should contact their local parish about making a profession of faith and receiving the sacraments of Confirmation and Eucharist through the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA).

 

Eucharistic Minister at St. Gabriel Catholic Church
This ministry assists the priest with the distribution of Holy Communion, and if a Priest is absent Liturgy of the Word with Holy Communion.

Requirements:

  • Member in good standing of the Catholic Church.
  • Confirmed in the Catholic Church.
  • Attends Mass regularly.
  • Understands and fully embraces the transubstantiation; that the bread and wine become the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ.

Time Requirement:

  • Must be available to attend the entire Mass assigned too. 
                (Saturday 6:30 PM, Sunday 8:00 & 11 AM) 
  •  Must be willing to participate in special Holy Day Masses and funerals, if available and called upon.

Training Requirement:

  • Attend a 1-hour training class, with annual refresher training prior to the beginning of either Lent, or Holy Week.

For more information contact the Parish Office (360) 876-2762 / [email protected]